Microform Reading Room

120 High Street | Reading Room Home | Hours

The papers consist of letters written to John J. Crittenden, law papers, a few copies of his own letters, and speeches relating to Crittenden’s political career in Kentucky and the United States Senate, with extensive material on the United States Civil War, 1861-1865, and the compromise efforts which proceeded it.

The papers consist of personal correspondence of Joshua Reed Giddings, Ohio abolitionist and politician, while he was serving as Abraham Lincoln’s consul-general in Canada. There is one microfilm reel, covering the years 1861-1864.

The papers of Lewis Tappan, merchant and abolitionist, consist of correspondence, letterbooks, journals, notebooks, clippings, photocopies, notes, and miscellanea. The journals and notebooks, which date from 1814-1869, document Tappan’s activities in the antislavery movement. The bulk of the correspondence consists of copies of Tappan’s outgoing letters. Originals are in the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Mary Estlin was the daughter of John B. Estlin (1785-1855), a prominent opthalmic surgeon of Bristol, England, a Unitarian reformer and anti-slavery supporter. She was a member of the Bristol and Clifton Auxiliary Ladies Anti-Slavery Society and maintained an extensive correspondence with fellow abolitionists in the United States. After the Civil War she transferred her energies to the Women’s Rights campaign.

The papers consist of correspondence, minutes, financial records, records of manumission and emigration, reports of colonial agents, pamphlets and books on the colonization movement, copies of the Maryland Colonization Journal and the Liberia Herald, and census records of Maryland in Liberia. The materials shed light on race relations and socioeconomic conditions in antebellum America and are a source of information on the founding of Liberia. The complete collection is available online.

Pages