Yale Center for British Art

1080 Chapel Street | Gallery Home | Hours

James Hakewill, A picturesque tour of the island of Jamaica, from drawings made in the years 1820 and 1821(London, 1825). The Yale Center for British Art also holds a number of original watercolors by Hakewill, which depict life in the British Caribbean prior to emancipation.

Created by British painter Francis Smith, circa 1760. Oil on canvas.

In 1771 Thomas Hearne began working for Sir Ralph Payne, the recently appointed Governor-General of the Leeward Islands, a group of sugar colonies consisting of Antigua, Nevis, St. Christopher’s (now St. Kitts), and Montserrat. Hearne spent three and a half years making working drawings and, after his return to England in 1775, produced twenty large and highly finished watercolors for Payne, of which only eight are now known.

A portrait of Elihu Yale (1649-1721) and associates being waited upon by an enslaved young man. Painted circa 1708. The Yale University Art Gallery owns a different version of this painting and a related portrait depicting Yale interacting with a similar “black servant.”

Created by Richard Bridgens, circa 1833. Apparently meant to represent Trinidad on the eve of emancipation. Graphite on wove paper, with additional text at the bottom.

Pages