United States

120 High Street | Reading Room Home | Hours

The papers consist of letters written to John J. Crittenden, law papers, a few copies of his own letters, and speeches relating to Crittenden’s political career in Kentucky and the United States Senate, with extensive material on the United States Civil War, 1861-1865, and the compromise efforts which proceeded it.

The papers consist of personal correspondence of Joshua Reed Giddings, Ohio abolitionist and politician, while he was serving as Abraham Lincoln’s consul-general in Canada. There is one microfilm reel, covering the years 1861-1864.

121 Wall Street | Library Home | Hours

Group of 18 financial documents connected to John M. McQuie, the majority of which document his purchases, and sales, of slaves. The bills of sale and receipts usually list the names, ages and prices of the slaves, and occasionally other personal characteristics. An indenture for the work of two of McQuie’s slaves specifies that their employer must agree to “treat said negroes with humanity & to find them in good holsome food & cloathing together with a blanket to each.”

128 Wall Street | Archives Home | Hours

Correspondence, diaries, writings and other papers of John Pitkin Norton, professor of agricultural chemistry at Yale from 1846-1852. Norton’s diaries contain observations on slavery and abolition, the Amistad case, the Liberty Party, religion, and temperance, among other topics. Professor Norton was also closely associated with the early days of the Sheffield Scientific School and was a pioneer in the application of scientific principles and methods to agriculture.

John W. Blassingame served as the acting chairman of Afro-American studies at Yale (1971-1972, 1976-1977) and as chairman (1981-1989). In the mid-1970s, he also became the editor and publisher of the papers of Frederick Douglass. He wrote and edited numerous works on the history of slavery in America. The papers consist of electrostatic copies of reseach materials and note cards used in the preparation of Blassingame’s 1971 Yale University Ph.D., A Social and Economic History of the Negro in New Orleans, 1860-1880.

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