Antislavery Movements

1111 Chapel Street | Gallery Home | Hours

The Greek Slave, by Hiram Powers, was the single most celebrated work of sculpture in nineteenth-century America. Its pose—inspired by the well-known Medici Venus—represents a Christian girl captured by the Turks during the Greek War of Independence, for sale in the slave market of Constantinople. The statue inspired an outpouring of prose and poetry and became an anti-slavery symbol for abolitionists.

120 High Street | Reading Room Home | Hours

The papers consist of correspondence, parliamentary speeches, working papers, notebooks, and political pamphlets documenting the life and work of Thomas Fowell Buxton, nineteenth century abolitionist and reformer. The originals are in the Rhodes House Library, University of Oxford, England.

The papers document the activities of the Pennsylvania Abolitionist Society, the first formal abolitionist society in America. Included are minutes from 1787 to 1916, and the society’s large collection of manuscripts dealing with abolition, dating from 1774 through 1868. More information is available online.

The papers of William Wilberforce (1759-1833) and Robert Isaac Wilberforce (1802-1857). Series one reproduces the Wilberforce papers from the Bodleian Library, Oxford (50 reels). Series two reproduces the papers of William Wilberforce and related slavery and anti-slavery materials from Wilberforce House, Hull (16 reels). Detailed research guides are available.

121 Wall Street | Library Home | Hours

The diary contains entries from July 1 to September 5, 1856, January 11 to March 11, 1857, and February 14 to June 12, 1858, describing Swift’s activities as a surveyor in Leavenworth, Kansas, and the local struggle between the Free-Soil and proslavery parties. One volume, fifty-one pages.

Pages