Antislavery Movements

120 High Street | Reading Room Home | Hours

The papers of Benjamin Tappan, lawyer, judge, U.S. Senator from Ohio, and active participant in the antislavery movement, consist of correspondence, speeches, legal and business papers, and miscellaneous material. The correspondence, which constitutes the bulk of the papers, relates to Tappan’s law practice, his activities in the antislavery movement, and to Ohio and national politics especially during the Jacksonian period.

Family members include author and suffragist Alice Stone Blackwell (1857-1950); her parents, Henry Browne Blackwell (1825-1909) and Lucy Stone (1818-1893), abolitionists and advocates of women’s rights; her aunt, Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910), the first woman to receive an academic medical degree; and Elizabeth Blackwell’s adopted daughter, Kitty Barry Blackwell (1848-1936). Includes correspondence, diaries, articles, and speeches of these and other Blackwell family members.

The papers contain correspondence, business and land records, writings, legal records, and maps of Peter Smith, land speculator and local politician in Madison County, New York and his son Gerrit Smith, land owner, philanthropist, reformer, abolitionist, and temperance advocate. 89 reels, plus finding aid.

409 Prospect Street | Library Home | Hours

Aaron Dutton and his son Samuel William Southmayd Dutton were Congregational clergymen in Connecticut who were known for their abolitionist views.  Aaron Dutton served as minister of the First Congregational Church in Guilford from 1806 until 1842, at which time he resigned due to the dissension in the congregation regarding his abolitionist stance. Samuel Dutton was minister at North Church (now United Church on the Green), New Haven from 1838 to 1866.  He was a noted champion of the antislavery cause. Selected sermons of Samuel Dutton and an article by Aaron Dutton are available online.

121 Wall Street | Library Home | Hours

The collection comprises Howe’s outgoing and incoming correspondence, third-party correspondence, and six manuscript writings pertaining to slavery and ethics. The letters address Howe’s religious beliefs, opposition to the institution of slavery, support of the temperance movement, the annexation of Texas, and other political matters.

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